Carrier oils are also known as vegetable, base or fixed oils, it is important that you buy good quality 100% pure and natural carrier oils; just as it is with essential oils, Carrier oils should always be labelled cold pressed or unrefined. If the oil is not labelled in this way then it will not be suitable for an aromatherapy massage, as the oil will have been extracted using extreme heat which robs the oil of its vitamin and mineral content, refining oils involves a heating process which is so extreme it leaves the oil almost black so to make it more acceptable they bleach it then deodorize and add artificially colours and we all cook and thus consume this on a regular basis!.

When preparing a blend, you need to take a few things into consideration. 1, the skin type of the person receiving the massage, 2, will the blend be stored for a period of time ( any longer than 5 – 6 weeks then you need to add an anti-oxidant such as avocado oil or Vit E . 3. Cost is another factor as some carriers oils are quite expensive such as borage seed, Calophyllum, calendula & rose hip ,this will be a consideration when deciding quantities especially when making blends to be used on the body,
Carrier oils are generally listed as saturated, mono unsaturated and polyunsaturated this is useful to be aware of, as it will give you an indication of the shelf life of the carrier oil.
Saturated: Least susceptible to rancidity. Examples shea butter, coconut oil, cocoa.
h h h h
(HYDRO CARBON CHAINS) h-c-c-c-c-h
h h h h
Saturated with as much hydrogen bonds as it can contain, leaving little space for oxygen molecules to penetrate and increase oxidization
Mono Unsaturated Examples macadamia, almond , apricot kernel,
H H H H
H- C – C = C- C-H
H H H H
Notice that there is a single double bond (=) (mono) allowing some oxygen which allows oxidization

Polyunsaturated – Essential fatty acids, goes rancid quickest Examples rosehip, borage, hemp seed, flaxseed, safflower, evening primrose oil.
H H H H
Many double bonds C = C- C = C- C= C
H H H H
Notice lots of double bonds (=) making these the most prone to oxidization and greatly reducing the shelf life of these carrier oils.